Inspired by the traditional German White Asparagus with ham and hollandaise sauce meal, this buckwheat crepe will help highlight this mysterious white veggie enveloped in a simple ham slice, salted butter and crunchy baby spinach.

It’s the season again for those early spring veggies! Many don’t know how to prepare them; they are a delicacy in many European countries, especially in Germany. It’s more tender and delicate than its green peer but also needs a bit more effort to prepare. Don’t be intimidated by them; they are succulent, elegant and delicate in taste and texture, a true pleasure for the mouth. This White Asparagus Buckwheat Crepe will highlight this mysterious veggie and make your crepe reach another level!

A German Delicacy

In South Germany, they have the “Spargelzeit,” or the asparagus period from late April to early June, where they open little shacks by the road where they sell white asparagus. The whiter and thicker, the better! If they turn pink, it means the freshness is gone, so they bump down the price. Oh, yes, I forgot to say, those white gold bars are quite expensive.

Why White?

white asparagus

No, it’s not another type of asparagus. This white asparagus is the same as the green one; it turns green when it comes out of the soil and hits the sun. To make them white, the cultivators prevent the asparagus from getting out of the soil. So they keep putting soil on them until they are big enough for consumption. To collect them, they use a sword-like instrument to cut through the mini hills of soil under which the asparagus hides. Art, if you ask me and also the reason for its price.

Technique

The technique for cooking white vs. green asparagus is dramatically different. Well, for the green one, you cut the end of the stem and grill or blanch them. So simple! For the white ones, you’ll need to peel the stem entirely, from head to toe, not just once but two or three layers, to get to the tender bit. With the tip of your fingers, you’ll need to feel this plastic-like fibre and keep shaving until this plasticish layer is gone. It’s where you’ll nail or not the tenderness. You can make a lovely soup with the leftovers (here is a link to make soup).

Buckwheat Crepe or Galette

White asparagus crepe

A typical French recipe for any savoury crepe would be buckwheat, which is gluten-free and has a way better glycemic index than white flour. They make all kinds of lovely crepes, also called galettes, with buckwheat flour, sometimes a mix of white flour, with or without egg or milk. Since it is so adaptable, I thought, ‘What better way to showcase the delicate white asparagus, ham and butter than this type of crepe?’

Storage

If you do too much batter, you can leave the batter covered in the fridge for the next day. Simply mix it up, add a bit of water if too thick and pour it into the pan for a quick lunch with ham and cheese or whatever else you fancy. You can also make the crepe and simply keep them well covered in plastic wrap in the refrigerator until further use.

Variations

I’ve used one of Germans’ favourite combos: white asparagus served with ham and butter. Not true! It is usually served with Hollandaise Sauce instead of plain butter, so if you want to indulge in this silky sauce, here’s how to make it. Otherwise, use some plain salted butter. I’ve also added a few baby spinach leaves for the crunch, but these are optional.

Other Crepes Recipes

So, let’s merge French and German culture!

White Asparagus Crepe

5 from 5 votes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
resting time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Calories 423
Elevate the German White Asparagus tradition with a buckwheat crepe featuring ham, salted butter, and baby spinach for a sensation and elegant dinner.

Equipment

  • Crepe pan or non-stick pan

Ingredients

Crepe

  • 300 g buckwheat flour
  • 500 ml water
  • 1 egg
  • salt

Filling

  • 20 white asparagus
  • 6 slices of cooked ham
  • baby spinach leaves
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • salt

Instructions 

Crepe Preparation

  • Mix the salt into the flour.
  • Add the egg in the center of the flour.
  • Add water in the center slowly and whisk from the center to the sides (to keep it smooth).
  • Once all mixed, pass through a meshed sieve to eliminate the unwanted lumps
  • Let set in the fridge for 1-2 hours.

White Asparagus

  • Rinse the asparagus, peel them from top to bottom, 2 to 3 timesthen cut the end tip at 2 cm from end.
  • Add water to a large skillet, just large enough and deep enough to add all of them. Bring to a simmer.
  • Add butter, salt, sugar and asparagus to the hot water and cook for 15 minutes until tender.

Final Step

  • Bring your nonstick pan to medium-high heat and add a little fat of your choice; cook the crepes (paper thin).
  • Add the butter to the white asparagus, then the baby spinach, add to the center of the crepe and cover with a slice of cooked ham.

Notes

Serve with a lovely white wine!
Author: Marie Breton
Calories: 423kcal
Course: Plato principal
Cuisine: Alemana, Francesa
Keyword: bechamel, buckwheat, butter, crepe, gluten free, spargel, white asparagus

Nutrition

Calories: 423kcal | Carbohydrates: 60g | Protein: 21g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Trans Fat: 0.1g | Cholesterol: 75mg | Sodium: 546mg | Potassium: 669mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 643IU | Vitamin C: 7mg | Calcium: 48mg | Iron: 4mg
Nutrition Facts
White Asparagus Crepe
Amount per Serving
Calories
423
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
13
g
20
%
Saturated Fat
 
5
g
31
%
Trans Fat
 
0.1
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
2
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
5
g
Cholesterol
 
75
mg
25
%
Sodium
 
546
mg
24
%
Potassium
 
669
mg
19
%
Carbohydrates
 
60
g
20
%
Fiber
 
8
g
33
%
Sugar
 
8
g
9
%
Protein
 
21
g
42
%
Vitamin A
 
643
IU
13
%
Vitamin C
 
7
mg
8
%
Calcium
 
48
mg
5
%
Iron
 
4
mg
22
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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