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Glühwein (German Mulled Wine) is a great hot beverage to have outdoors on a cold evening with good friends. Spiced to perfect and sweeter than wine, this concoction is heart-warming around the Holiday season. Glühwein is a warm and spiced wine is made to be taken outside, at the Christmas market, but it could also just be outside after a winter activity or to welcome guests over with this heartwarming drink. My husband is German, and his whole family enjoys every year going to the Christmas market while sipping on that comforting spiced-up wine. It makes you forget about the cold, and dipping your nose into the cup (yes, they drink this in a cup) makes you think of those perfect Christmas memories. The Spices The secret to a good gluhwein finds itself in the spices. I suggest some mix here, with lots of cardamom, but you could modify it slightly to…

Here is an exquisite selection of the Best Winter Soups to elevate your winter dining experience. As the frosty winds and chilly evenings set in, these soul-soothing main meal soups are the perfect companions to warm your heart and fill your kitchen with delightful aromas. From comforting classics to inventive twists, join us in exploring a collection from around the world that promises to make this winter season a culinary delight. Get ready to cozy up and savor the goodness of winter in every comforting spoonful! The list is separated into subdivisions: Pasta or Noodle Potato Beans & Lentils Meat Other The Pasta-Noodles Soups 1. Spicy Potsticker Soup from Lord Byron’s Kitchen Get frozen potstickers, wontons, or dumplings from your local store. For a delicious and healthy Spicy Potsticker Soup, cook them in a savory broth with green onions, garlic, ginger, and carrots. It is a fast, easy winter soup;…

A drunken Bistro French Onion Soup with thyme, wine and a final touch of Brandy, then gratinated with a piece of toasted bread and exquisite Gruyere cheese until golden perfection. There is nothing like a fuming hot onion soup! Bistro French Onion Soup contains all the best from France: Red wine, bread and cheese. This gratinated soup, which means it needs to finish up in the oven, will warm you up guaranteed on a cold winter night. This version is made with olive oil instead of butter, red instead of white wine and a touch of thyme, garlic and Brandy to give it a more fragrant touch. That moment before getting in… is as lovely as cracking into a creme brulée. This soup dates from the 15th century; although many variations exist here and there, the French gratinated one is the best known worldwide. It used to be a soup for…

Bouilli or pot au feu québécois is a traditional beef stew from Québec, Canada. Inspired by the famous dish ‘pot au feu’ from France—a simple stew made of root vegetables, beef, and pork belly simmered until tender. As a kid, I visited my grandparents once or twice a year. They lived in a small and remote village far away in the forest called Lac-des-Aigles (Eagles Lake). We would always arrive in the late afternoon, and the cast iron pot would already be doing its magic on the stove for hours. A succulent and traditional meat stew called Bouilli was the typical welcome smell of my grandma’s place. Such a treat! A Winter Stew This recipe is a flashback to those pleasant visits to my grandparent’s place. My grandma would make this recipe from September, when the root veggies were fully grown, until the end of winter. As one knows, Quebec, my homeland, has inherited…

A traditional family dinner that is part of every French Canadian table is the famous ‘paté chinois.’ A three-layered pie of ground meat followed by corn and topped with mashed potatoes. This version has a Spanish flair with extra paprika, garlic, and thyme. Paté Chinois / French Canadian Shepherd’s pie is a typically French Canadian meal… Created by British railroad workers, in the 19th century, as an imitation of the famous “cottage pie” (beef, lamb and mashed potatoes). The dish was an imminent “hit,” at least, for the “on-site” railroad workers, including many French Canadians and Chinese workers. The French brought it back home and called it: Chinese paté… which has nothing to do with China… The “paté chinois” differs from the cottage pie or shepherd’s pie mainly because the corn layer in the middle was a cheap and easy ingredient. For the majority, this is the meal every household does…

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