Tag

ham

Browsing

Buckwheat Crepe is a gluten-free crepe made with four ingredients: buckwheat, water, egg and salt. An authentic Crêpe/Galette Bretonne! With a bunch of holes and a simple filling of ham and cheese. Buckwheat Crepe is a recipe from my ancestors back in Bretagne, France. I’ve learned that the “Crêpe Bretonne,” aka thin pancakes, is quite different from the regular buckwheat crepe; the Breton version needs to be crunchy, thinner and filled with those minuscule holes, while the average “galette” they call in France is a softer buckwheat crepe. Regular Crêpe & Galette vs. Crêpe Bretonne First, a Crêpe is a white flour super thin pancake eaten with a sweet filling and served all over France. The galette is usually a mix of buckwheat and white flour, egg and milk, as seen in many recipes on the web, and is generally filled with savoury fillings. In Bretagne, the north-west region of…

Inspired by the traditional German White Asparagus with ham and hollandaise sauce meal, this buckwheat crepe will help highlight this mysterious white veggie enveloped in a simple ham slice, salted butter and crunchy baby spinach. It’s the season again for those early spring veggies! Many don’t know how to prepare them; they are a delicacy in many European countries, especially in Germany. It’s more tender and delicate than its green peer but also needs a bit more effort to prepare. Don’t be intimidated by them; they are succulent, elegant and delicate in taste and texture, a true pleasure for the mouth. This White Asparagus Buckwheat Crepe will highlight this mysterious veggie and make your crepe reach another level! A German Delicacy In South Germany, they have the “Spargelzeit,” or the asparagus period from late April to early June, where they open little shacks by the road where they sell white…

These Galician Scallops, also known as Zamburiñas, are exquisite especially served with a smooth white wine béchamel and a crunchy Iberic ham! Surf and Turf at its best! The Variegated Scallops, called Zamburiñas in Spain, is a small variety of scallops that are about half more petite than average scallops. Check the picture below to see the difference. Those mollusks change sex many times during their lifetime to end up male. Which I find strange because ‘shell’ or “Concha” in Spanish means “the lady part” in South America… Well, let’s leave it to that! The Coral The coral (roe) is also eaten in Spain, especially with this smaller variety of scallops. The coral is that orange part lying on the side of the scallop, with Zamburiñas way more tender than the usual scallops. If you make the recipe with normal-sized scallops, you should avoid leaving them in; they are usually quite rough to…

One of the most appreciated Tapas in Spain is the famous cured ham croquette made with bechamel. Spanish Ham Croquettes have a crunchy exterior with an ultra-creamy interior, impossible not to fall for those little bites. The Spanish Ham Croquettes or Croquetas, as they say in Spain, are simple to do. It’s basically a thick Béchamel sauce mixed up with cured ham, codfish, cuttlefish, mushrooms, or anything you want. In Spain, the most beloved gastronomic tapa would probably be Iberic ham croquetas. A pure delight! However most of the time, they are made out of serrano ham, the equivalent of prosciutto ham. But indeed it can be replaced by whatever cured ham you prefer or leftovers you have. Usually served as a tapas, it could also make a great light lunch served with a green or couscous salad. History of Croquetas Back in the day, they would use the leftovers of meat…

An extra vivid Green Asparagus Soup to start spring on the right foot. A simple soup made of asparagus, cream, broth, leeks and a topping of crunchy cured ham. Asparagus is the spring vegetable by excellence, although it became an all-year-long available veggie with globalization. A favourite of many, this long vegetable comes in many colours and forms, whether green, white or even purple. These veggies are simply irresistible. The white ones were collected before they could even reach the sun. The most common one, the green, is enjoyable in millions of ways, whether grilled, boiled or fried. In this case, in a Green Asparagus Soup! No Thickeners This soup is unctuous, as long as you don’t add too much broth or water. There are no thickeners, potatoes, eggs, or added starch; it’s simply plenty of asparagus. I’ve used chicken broth with it, but it could simply be water or vegetable broth.…

EN