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These Galician Scallops also known as Zamburiñas are exquisite served with a smooth white wine béchamel and a crunchy iberic ham! Surf and Turf at it’s best! The Variegated Scallops or Zamburiñas are a small variety of Galician scallops about twice or three times smaller than normal scallops. Check the picture below to see the difference. Those mollusks are changing sex many times during their lifetime to end up male. Which I find strange because ‘shell’ or “concha” in Spanish means “the lady part” in South America… Well, let’s leave it to that! The coral In Spain, the coral (roe) is also eaten, especially with this smaller variety of scallops. The coral is that orange part lying on the side of the scallop, with Zamburiñas way more tender than the usual scallops. If you make the recipe with normal sized scallops, you should avoid leaving them in, they are usually quite rough to…

One of the most apreciated Tapa in Spain is the famous cured ham croqueta made solely with bechamel. Resulting into a crunchy exterior with a ultra creamy and tasty interior. The croquetas are simple to do, it’s basically a thicker Béchamel sauce mixed with whether cured ham, cod fish, cuttlefish, mushrooms… anything you want. Also, you can make a big batch and freeze the rest for later, which makes them polivalent. I would say the cured ham croquetas are the most common in Spain or at least in the Catalonia region. Occasionally made out of the famous iberic ham, coming from the black iberic pigs but most of the time they are made out of serrano ham, the normal ham coming form white pigs. But surely it can be replace by whatever cured ham you prefer, and budget you have. The croquetas are shared as tapas accompanied with a drink but it could also…

Asparagus are the spring vegetable by excellence, although with globalization it became an all year long available veggie. A favorite of many, like myself, this long green vegetable is simply irresistible. This soup is an onctuous one, as long as you don’t add too much broth, or water to it. There is absolutely not thickeners; no potatoes, no eggs, no starch, it’s simply plenty of asparagus. I’ve used a chicken broth with it, but it could simply be water or vegetable broth and it would be still as delicious.  I like to play with texture when I create a dish, so for this one I had a touch of slightly cooked and crunchy cured ham to accompany. I’ve used it timidly and it’s totally optional of course, but the slightly cooked cured ham with this soup is adding a whole new texture and welcomes salthy bite to the smooth green soup. A green soup…

It’s season again, for those premature spring veggies! Those are one of a kind, I knew they existed but never had the opportunity to try them out, “well done” until I’ve met my in-laws. I’ve encountered my first white asparagus at my husband’s mom place, I remembered eating them once before but they were though and not tender at all. The mom although… she nailed it, I was baptised all over again, a new beginning for me, those delicate white asparagus were suddenly on my top 10 favorite veggies list. She made them simply with cooked ham, and little butter and it was fantastic! In Germany they have what they call the “Spargelzeit”, a period from april to early june I think… They have all those stands selling those white jewels on the streets, a bit like apple time back in North America. Also, I got the first seat while doing a bike tour through…

eThis is a recipe from my ancestors back in Bretagne, France. I’ve learn that the “bretons” crepe, aka thin pancake, is quite different from the normal buckwheat crepe, the breton one needs to be crunchy, thinner and filled with those minuscule holes while the normal “galette” they call in french is a soft buckwheat crepe. I saw many recipes on the web, they often turn the normal crepe while the “Crêpe Bretonne” stays on one side only. Also it must make a sizzling sound when it first touch the pan. So let’s try to make that crispy Breton crepe. First of all, buckwheat is technically no wheat product…  Let me explain; it’s actually the seeds of a flower that makes the flour, nothing to do with the grass. It’s also a gluten free flour, so for those of you who are sensible to gluten, it’ s a great alternative. This…

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